Abraham Maslow

Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation" in Psychological Review. Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans' innate curiosity. His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, some of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow used the terms "physiological", "safety", "belongingness" and "love", "esteem", "self-actualization", and "self-transcendence" to describe the pattern that human motivations generally move through.

Maslow studied what he called exemplary people such as Albert Einstein, Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Frederick Douglass rather than mentally ill or neurotic people, writing that "the study of crippled, stunted, immature, and unhealthy specimens can yield only a cripple psychology and a cripple philosophy." Maslow studied the healthiest 1% of the college student population.

Maslow's theory was fully expressed in his 1954 book Motivation and Personality. The hierarchy remains a very popular framework in sociology research, management training[6] and secondary and higher psychology instruction.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow%27s_hierarchy_of_needs

Maslow lived until 1970, though, and the pyramid we're most familiar with doesn’t represent his final thoughts on the matter. In his later years, he added a new apex to the pyramid: self-transcendence.

About Dustin

It all began at a place called Cousin Jed's Guitar Shed in Grandview Missouri. I came home with a JB Player "Professional Series" guitar with EMG selects, a Floyd Rose, built in wireless, and an obnoxious little Gorilla amplifier - and began torturing my mother with them right away. I was all of 16 years old then.

I was raised in the Springfield MO area, but had traveled to 6 of the 7 continents by age 24 compliments of Uncle Sam. I joined the Navy and traveled the world during the early 90's, and played pretty regular until I was married in 1996. The Ibanez RG-550 I bought myself just before I turned twenty (I was born in 1970) saw most of that travel, and finally fell apart in 1996. Not long after, music took a back seat to starting a family. By 2005 the marriage had failed and I spent some of the settlement money on new gear - namely a '72 Thinline Telecaster reissue, a Digitech GNX4, and an Orange AD30TC. I also had a Taylor 412 to keep my acoustic bug happy. I slowly assembled a small home studio, working through ProTracks, then Cuebase, before finally settling on a ProTools mAudio solution. Returning to what I loved, and what originally satisfied so many expressive needs for me, I had to work pretty hard to get close to the kind of player I once was, but my situation in life afforded me several hours to practice every day. I fell in with the open blues jam crowd at the now defunct Blayney's in Westport, playing alongside many wonderful and talented folks most every Tuesday night like Mark and Sue of Wyandotte County based "Blue 88". Iron indeed sharpens iron.

I also discovered the Burning Man community and culture during this time, which begat an introduction to the love of my life. Once I fell, there was no turning back... long story short, with the economy in the toilet I became divested of the majority of my gear slowly over time to pay bills. I then relocated to sunny Southern California to be with her, and it didn't work out. (And as can happen if/when you don't really have it "together", became divested over time of most every instrument I owned.)

I purchased a cheap Yamaha FG700S accoustic guitar for my 42nd birthday in 2013, and I'm doing my best to spend at least an hour each day working on new chord structures, scales, and stepping into whatever kind of musician it is I'm supposed to be. For quite a while, I'll only be tossing short pieces I've worked out in front of my LG Android Phone, in mono. My more polished bits are from GarageBand on a now ancient 1st generation iPad. Hopefully the day gig will net what's needed to rebuild the home studio in 21st Century fashion.

I have a TON of influences, and they run the full spectrum of musical styles with the exception of "tear in my beer" country, or hard core gangsta rap. Many influences (in no particular order [well OK, Tool first]) include:

Tool, The Prayer Chain, Fold Zandura, A Perfect Circle, Oasis, The Gorillaz, Led Zeppelin, Space Hog, Brad, Bob Marley, Better Than Ezra, Audioslave, Rage Against The Machine, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Eric Johnson, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Kula Shaker, Frank Zappa, The Moody Blues, The Pimps, Radiohead, Traffic, System Of A Down, Queensryche, Portishead, The Cult, Lenny Kravitz, The Cure, Corrosion Of Conformity, Nine Inch Nails, No Doubt, Orbital, Particle, Massive Attack, John Mayer, Hooverphonic, Extreme, Faith No More, Pink Floyd, Garbage, Brother Cain, Cake, Dada, HIM, Jane's Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Madonna